Click Here

The Ultimate Productivity Tool

Sahil Bloom

Welcome to the 242 new members of the curiosity tribe who have joined us since Wednesday. Join the 57,887 others who are receiving high-signal, curiosity-inducing content every single week.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content,

just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

  • mldsa
  • ,l;cd
  • mkclds

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of"

nested selector

system.

Today at a Glance:

  • The Eisenhower Decision Matrix is a simple, powerful tool anyone can use to prioritize effectively and enhance daily productivity. It’s a visualization tool that forces you to differentiate between the urgent and the important.
  • The four quadrants of the 2x2 matrix: Important & Urgent (“Do Now”), Important & Not Urgent (“Decide”), Not Important & Urgent (“Delegate”), and Not Important & Not Urgent (“Delete”).
  • The goal is to spend more time on important tasks that further your long-term values, missions, goals, and principles. In Eisenhower Decision Matrix terms: Manage the top-right, optimize for the top-left, and remove the bottom half.

The Ultimate Productivity Tool

We’ve all been there.

Scrambling from task to task, moving from one stress-inducing fire to the next. The minute one fire is out, another one is sparked. The day becomes an energy-draining fight to survive.

The worst part? At the end of it all, it’s hard to point to any substantive progress. There was a lot of movement, but no forward progress—a “rocking horse” day, if you will.

Today, I’d like to share a simple, immediately-actionable solution to this all-too-common problem. To set the stage, a short history lesson…

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight David Eisenhower—or Ike as his friends called him—was an American military officer and politician born in Denison, Texas in 1890.

He was a West Point graduate and rose through the military to achieve the 5-star rank of general in the United States Army. During World War II, he served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe and led the famed invasion of Normandy from the Western Front.

Eisenhower would serve as President of Columbia University and the first Supreme Commander of NATO before being elected as the 34th President of the United States, a role he occupied from 1953 to 1961.

As his military and civilian accomplishments indicate, Eisenhower was a highly-effective leader and executive. He became known for his prolific, almost otherworldly productivity.

His secret? He never confused the urgent with the important:

"What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

With this idea as a foundation, let’s dive into today’s prioritization and productivity solution…

The Eisenhower Decision Matrix

The Eisenhower Decision Matrix is a simple, powerful tool anyone can use to prioritize effectively and enhance daily productivity. It’s a visualization tool that forces you to differentiate between the urgent and the important. The matrix was popularized by Stephen R. Covey in his famous 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

Here’s how the 2x2 matrix works:

  • X-Axis: Not Urgent to Urgent
  • Y-Axis: Not Important to Important

Two key definitions:

  • Urgent: requires immediate, focused attention to complete.
  • Important: promotes or furthers your long-term values, goals, or principles.

The four quadrants of the Eisenhower Decision Matrix:

  1. Important & Urgent
  2. Important & Not Urgent
  3. Not Important & Urgent
  4. Not Important & Not Urgent

A quick discussion of each…

Important & Urgent

These are the tasks that are both important and urgent.

They require immediate, focused attention—but also contribute to our long-term vision, goals, or principles.

I call these the "Do Now!" tasks. They are time sensitive, but also contribute to real forward progress.

Important & Not Urgent

These are the tasks that are important but not very urgent.

I like to think of these tasks as the compounders—the tasks that compound long-term value in your life. The most successful people in the world find a way to focus their energy on these tasks.

This is where you should try to spend most of your time and energy. You can decide when to attack them, but you need to prioritize this quadrant.

Not Important & Urgent

These are the tasks that are not important, but they are urgent and require attention.

These tasks are the "beware" category—the tasks that can drain time and energy without contributing to our end goals. These are the fires or random one-offs that leave you feeling drained but without meaningful progress.

These are tasks to delegate to someone else—ideally to someone for whom they will be important.

Not Important & Not Urgent

These are the tasks that are neither important nor urgent.

These are the mindless activities like TV and social media that sap our productivity. Limit your time on these as much as possible.

Sahil Note: If these mindless activities help you recharge, they may be "important" for you in some modest quantities. I personally find that watching a show before bed allows me to unwind and shut off to sleep with a clear mind. There is no need to eliminate that from your life, just be honest with yourself about the point at which it is no longer creating value for you. If you have a tough time being disciplined with it—I certainly used to!—schedule time for these activities.

The Big Picture

Ok, so let’s put it all together. What’s the goal here?

Spend more time on important tasks that further your long-term values, missions, goals, and principles.

In Eisenhower Decision Matrix terms:

  • Manage the top-right
  • Optimize for the top-left
  • Remove the bottom half

Conclusion

To leverage the Eisenhower Decision Matrix in your life, start by identifying what is important to you.

A few questions to get you started:

  • What are your long-term goals?
  • What principles and values do you want to build towards?
  • What tasks in your daily life contribute to those goals, principles, and values?

Try planning and executing a week—or even just a day—according to the matrix. I use it weekly and love it.

There are plenty of free online tools to help you leverage the Eisenhower Decision Matrix to structure your productivity practice. I use a Notion template, but you can find other pre-built templates quite easily. You can also be like Ike and use a notebook to do it the old fashioned way!

Give it a shot and let me know what you think!

The Ultimate Productivity Tool

Sahil Bloom

Welcome to the 242 new members of the curiosity tribe who have joined us since Wednesday. Join the 57,887 others who are receiving high-signal, curiosity-inducing content every single week.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content,

just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

  • mldsa
  • ,l;cd
  • mkclds

How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of"

nested selector

system.

Today at a Glance:

  • The Eisenhower Decision Matrix is a simple, powerful tool anyone can use to prioritize effectively and enhance daily productivity. It’s a visualization tool that forces you to differentiate between the urgent and the important.
  • The four quadrants of the 2x2 matrix: Important & Urgent (“Do Now”), Important & Not Urgent (“Decide”), Not Important & Urgent (“Delegate”), and Not Important & Not Urgent (“Delete”).
  • The goal is to spend more time on important tasks that further your long-term values, missions, goals, and principles. In Eisenhower Decision Matrix terms: Manage the top-right, optimize for the top-left, and remove the bottom half.

The Ultimate Productivity Tool

We’ve all been there.

Scrambling from task to task, moving from one stress-inducing fire to the next. The minute one fire is out, another one is sparked. The day becomes an energy-draining fight to survive.

The worst part? At the end of it all, it’s hard to point to any substantive progress. There was a lot of movement, but no forward progress—a “rocking horse” day, if you will.

Today, I’d like to share a simple, immediately-actionable solution to this all-too-common problem. To set the stage, a short history lesson…

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight David Eisenhower—or Ike as his friends called him—was an American military officer and politician born in Denison, Texas in 1890.

He was a West Point graduate and rose through the military to achieve the 5-star rank of general in the United States Army. During World War II, he served as Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe and led the famed invasion of Normandy from the Western Front.

Eisenhower would serve as President of Columbia University and the first Supreme Commander of NATO before being elected as the 34th President of the United States, a role he occupied from 1953 to 1961.

As his military and civilian accomplishments indicate, Eisenhower was a highly-effective leader and executive. He became known for his prolific, almost otherworldly productivity.

His secret? He never confused the urgent with the important:

"What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

With this idea as a foundation, let’s dive into today’s prioritization and productivity solution…

The Eisenhower Decision Matrix

The Eisenhower Decision Matrix is a simple, powerful tool anyone can use to prioritize effectively and enhance daily productivity. It’s a visualization tool that forces you to differentiate between the urgent and the important. The matrix was popularized by Stephen R. Covey in his famous 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

Here’s how the 2x2 matrix works:

  • X-Axis: Not Urgent to Urgent
  • Y-Axis: Not Important to Important

Two key definitions:

  • Urgent: requires immediate, focused attention to complete.
  • Important: promotes or furthers your long-term values, goals, or principles.

The four quadrants of the Eisenhower Decision Matrix:

  1. Important & Urgent
  2. Important & Not Urgent
  3. Not Important & Urgent
  4. Not Important & Not Urgent

A quick discussion of each…

Important & Urgent

These are the tasks that are both important and urgent.

They require immediate, focused attention—but also contribute to our long-term vision, goals, or principles.

I call these the "Do Now!" tasks. They are time sensitive, but also contribute to real forward progress.

Important & Not Urgent

These are the tasks that are important but not very urgent.

I like to think of these tasks as the compounders—the tasks that compound long-term value in your life. The most successful people in the world find a way to focus their energy on these tasks.

This is where you should try to spend most of your time and energy. You can decide when to attack them, but you need to prioritize this quadrant.

Not Important & Urgent

These are the tasks that are not important, but they are urgent and require attention.

These tasks are the "beware" category—the tasks that can drain time and energy without contributing to our end goals. These are the fires or random one-offs that leave you feeling drained but without meaningful progress.

These are tasks to delegate to someone else—ideally to someone for whom they will be important.

Not Important & Not Urgent

These are the tasks that are neither important nor urgent.

These are the mindless activities like TV and social media that sap our productivity. Limit your time on these as much as possible.

Sahil Note: If these mindless activities help you recharge, they may be "important" for you in some modest quantities. I personally find that watching a show before bed allows me to unwind and shut off to sleep with a clear mind. There is no need to eliminate that from your life, just be honest with yourself about the point at which it is no longer creating value for you. If you have a tough time being disciplined with it—I certainly used to!—schedule time for these activities.

The Big Picture

Ok, so let’s put it all together. What’s the goal here?

Spend more time on important tasks that further your long-term values, missions, goals, and principles.

In Eisenhower Decision Matrix terms:

  • Manage the top-right
  • Optimize for the top-left
  • Remove the bottom half

Conclusion

To leverage the Eisenhower Decision Matrix in your life, start by identifying what is important to you.

A few questions to get you started:

  • What are your long-term goals?
  • What principles and values do you want to build towards?
  • What tasks in your daily life contribute to those goals, principles, and values?

Try planning and executing a week—or even just a day—according to the matrix. I use it weekly and love it.

There are plenty of free online tools to help you leverage the Eisenhower Decision Matrix to structure your productivity practice. I use a Notion template, but you can find other pre-built templates quite easily. You can also be like Ike and use a notebook to do it the old fashioned way!

Give it a shot and let me know what you think!